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The War Room With Jennifer Granholm

News/Business. (2012) (CC) (Stereo)

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ac3

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Nancy Pelosi 13, Us 5, Dennis 4, Allstate 3, California 3, In Ohio 2, America 2, Ohio 2, Forsythe 2, Kellie 2, Kellie Copeland 2, Alaska 1, You Bet 1, Ask An Allstate 1, Washington 1, Tom 1, Ohio Via Skype 1, Unhealthy 1, Doge Dart 1, Anna 1,
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  Current    The War Room With Jennifer Granholm    News/Business.   
   (2012)  (CC) (Stereo)  

    November 14, 2012
    9:00 - 10:00pm PST  

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the golden years as the conservatives call them, we had the highest tax rates, and the highest amount of growth, and the highest amount of jobs. those are facts.
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>>"if you ever raise taxes on the rich, you're going to destroy our economy." not true! >> jennifer: an international story caught my attention and to me it's really troubling. in ireland a 31-year-old woman went to the hospital in extreme pain. turned out she was pregnant. she was told that her baby would not survive and she would miscarry. they said that would take only a few hours. she was in terrible pain for three days until the baby eventually died in his or her womb. during that three-day period she asked doctors to terminate the pregnancy several times. begged them because it was so painful and the baby was going to die. they told her because ireland is
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a catholic country, it's illegal to abort a fetus with a detectable heartbeat. after the miscarriage the woman's only health continued to deteriorate. she was then put in intensive care where three days later she died. now this is a tragedy that never ever should have happened. here's even a more chilling thought. there are now laws in this country in america that could put women in a similar position. in ohio lawmakers are going to consider a fetal heartbeat bill this session. the bill would do what happened in ireland. it would make abortion a crime as soon as a fetal heartbeat is detected. that could happen before a woman even knows that she's pregnant. this is not just a fringe bees piece
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of legislation. it now has 50 cosponsors. in ohio, 2012, 50 cosponsors. in may they spoke on the state house steps. >> for the glory of god and the advancement of christian faith. we need to remind that james madison said that basically the error of roe v. wade has led to tierny of our land. >> jennifer: you want to talk about tyranny of taking over a woman's body, her own health, her own life. that's tyranny. today the ohio's house health committee voted to defund, you guessed it, planned parenthood. that bill is going to the house
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bill for debate. joining me now kellie copeland. kellie is coming to us via skype from akron ohio. welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> jennifer: you bet. just curious about the fight there. what went through your head when you heard about this irish woman, and how concerned are you that laws like that could pass in ohio? >> well, it's obviously tragic, and it illustrates that politics can be deadly. politics can kill women if women are not protected. ohio passed the heartbeat bill, and we had it stalled in the senate. the rumor is that a compromise bill has been worked out. it's not been worked out with us, but the anti-choice community in how to outlaw abortion in our state.
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the rumor is that they'll try to pass it through this lame duck session with the governor's blessing. >> jennifer: is that likely to happen? >> you know, i wouldn't put anything past this legislature. they have passed more anti-choice laws in this last session than in the last ten years combined, and really anything goes with this bunch. >> jennifer: well, ohio is--you know is a moderate state or at least it went for the president this year, which we're all very grateful for. what is going on? why are we seeing such extreme legislation at the state level and i'll just ask you this, what would it mean for ohio women if the legislature, for example does that and defunds planned planned parenthood. >> it's jerry manned dering. more people voted democrat for the state legislature in the state of ohio than republican yet we have two-thirds
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anti-choice and majority in our legislature. it's simply because they got to pick the district. the politicians got to pick their constituents, not the other way around. they know they can pretty much act within anything they would like to do because they really don't have to face the voters. they pick the voters they'll face. and in terms of defunding planned parenthood, an it's not just them. it's other stand-alone family planning clinics as well as who may not even offer abortion services but we know at least 13 counties in the state could lose funding entirely for family planning services. these are rural counties where there is no public transportation, and these women may n ninin anothertherroroder forfoasas hlthcare n ndsds it's 's really a dangerous situation. >> jennifer: kellie, i appreciate you coming and explaining to us what is going on in ohio. this too is something that we'll be following. kellie copeland, assistant
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director in ohio via skype. we have people like nancy pelosi to lead the charge in the battle. we'll talk then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...allstate safe driving bonus check? what is that? so weird, right? my agent, tom, said... [ voice of dennis ] ...only allstate sends you a bonus check for every six months you're accident-free... ...but i'm a woman.
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maybe it's a misprint. does it look like a misprint? ok. what i was trying... [ voice of dennis ] silence. ♪ ♪ ask an allstate agent about the safe driving bonus check. are you in good hands?
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>> jennifer: nancy pelosi is going to continue to serve as house minority leader. she made her announcement as a press conference today surrounded by female members of congress. there were a couple of really telling moments at today's event. there were many of them, but i want to point out a couple. first, watch this small moment carefully when nancy pelosi calls for the first question of the president conference. listen for which reporters are calling out questions. take a listen. >> a lot of our male friends
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wanted to come out here. this is girl's morning out. any questions? >> yes yes yes. >> was there ever a moment you considered not staying on? >> jennifer: did you catch that? she chose not to answer the louder male reporter, but instead she answered the female reporter. i know it was a tiny choice, a small moment, but to me it exemplifies why nancy pelosi is such a great leader. because leadership is exercised in decisions large and small. it would have been an easy decision to default to the louder questioner, but instead she was aware enough, she was sensitive enough to call upon the female reporter, maybe because nancy pelosi unconsciously saw in her the hopes of all those young women out there who are talked over in meetings or in the classroom.
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she saw her because undoubtedly she has been her. the second reason i'm so happy that she has decided to stay on as minority leader is that in that press conference when a young male reporter asked about whether she was too old to continue in leadership, whether the leadership should just give itself up for more junior members, she first noted that no one had asked that question of the male leaders like mitch mcconnell then she calmly graciously explained not just to the reporter but to all those who may not understand that often women don't accrue the necessary seniority for traditional advancement because they're penalized when they decide to spend time raising their families. nancy pelosi was elected to congress at age 47, after she had raised her family. many of her male counterparts were elected in their 30s
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presumably while their wives were raising their families. of course they have more seniority at each calendar year in their lives. now she explains she did not regret her choices but it's one reason why women don't get as many plum assignments, because they don't have the seniority. so in staying on nancy pelosi is really looking out for those young women who are coming up. she's help to go redefine seniority and status on her terms. i am grateful and relieved to know it. third, really importantly there is no woman who is more vilified by the right than nancy pelosi. republicans use nancy pelosi as the whipping girl relentlessly, repeatedly incessantly. being the object of that much focus and hatred and fear, really requires a backbone of
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steel and a skinned a thick as ary no, sir certificate rouse. rye no, sir rouse. she could laugh read, pick up a hobby instead of with standing the arrows of her antagonists. she decided to stay not just for herself but for all of us. for that i'm really grateful. i want to thank leader pelosi for her decision to lead in things big and small the thousands of decision being made every day by nancy pelosi and those she inspires will, will bend the arc of history towards justice as bobby kennedy described it. thank you ma'am for not taking the easy way. thank you for your battle scars scars that will show that you are willing to fight worthy battles on our behalf. so why exactly did nancy pelosi
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decide to stay on for leader of the house for democrats? we'll turn to someone she really knows, war room christine pelosi who happens to be nancy pelosi's daughter and chair of the california democratic women's caucus. thank you for being here on this great day. >> this is a great day. i'm very proud. it seems forever ago in political time, that as your daughter i want you to do what you feel in your heart is right. you have done it. you've proved it. you've been there. you've been speaker. you can do whatever you want to do. >> jennifer: she could retire, rest on her laurels. >> and i said as an activist i really want you to stay. as a woman's right's activist why is it after an election the men stay.
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why do the women have to go? we're looking at that safety net. why don't we have a woman standing up there for american women. turns out i wasn't alone. there was an outpouring from people who said tell her don't even think about leaving. women leaders labor leaders religious leaders. a priest got in my face the other night. okay father, i'll let her know. fighting for justice reform safety net jobs. remember, this is a class classic dilemma that women face. we still do something if we can. >> jennifer: it's about action getting results. >> you have to. absolutely. i'm very excited. when i woke up this morning and saw that group of fabulous women, it was so great so diverse. i saw people who are working on the violence against women act jobs small business.
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i've seen combat women come in and address women in the military. there is a lot of good talent to nurture. >> jennifer: and the point that she made is really--there are all the women but we need to make sure that they're gaining foot holds in the seniority rosters of congress, and she's in a tremendous position to make sure they're promoted. the fact that you combine women and minority of congress there is a majority of that coalition now in congress for the first time in history. and that your mom is leading that. i think that's really appropriate, don't you think? >> look at the census. this is the future. as she said this morning. this is what america looks like. this is what the future of our country looks like. what we learned in this election is that the future is on the side of those who care about diversity. we need a bigger, broader and
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equality and campaign reform to get there. >> jennifer: i'll get there but first let me ask a question about your mom. she's known for not having a stop button, essentially. it seems to me, you know, as someone who is a couple of decades her junior that she is relentless. it exhausts me how much she has got going on. how does they do that? >> chocolate. she eats chocolate ice cream for breakfast. my daughter is trying to emulate her grandmother in all ways, including eating eye cream for breakfast. >> jennifer: that's good to know. forget the notes just send chocolate. i want to read a note by paul lindsay. this was i was getting to with respect to her being sort of a focal point for the republicans.
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he said there is no peter person to preside over the most liberal house democratic caucus in history than the woman who is solely responsible for relegating it to a prolonged minority status. this decision signals that house democrats have absolutely no interest in regaining the trust and confidence of the american people. how can your mother gracious as she is, find common ground with somebody who puts out a statement like that about her. >> you're not going to find common ground with a spokesperson who says that about any democrat. they say that and then say it's really to do that you're so polarizing. no, it's too bad that you spend $80 million saying mean things about me. two economic stimulus passage more jobs out of this administration and bipartisan progress on veteran's benefits. it is possible for democrats and republicans to work together. if she made progress with nancy
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pelosi and george bush was together then she and john boehner and barack obama can work together. >> jennifer: with all these slings and arrows, she knows it's not about her. >> that's the biggest lesson in politics, you have to be bigger than yourself. >> jennifer: christine, thank you so much, my dear. up next, hunger is everywhere even where you least expect it. after the break we're going to visit an elementary school that is trying to feed the need in an unlikely county. part of our series on hunger. it's a story that you'll when we think of hunger we often picture people in the third world. >> many americans don't realize that the problem exists right here in our own country. >> it's an issue that ultimately effects each and every one of us. >> thats why current is stepping up. >>... feeding the needy. >>... feeding the needy. >>... feeding the needy. >>... feeding the needy. >> for an entire week we'll explore hunger, malnutrition even obesity. >> ... and offer solutions. >> so join us here at current tv
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where together, we'll feed the needy. >> brought to you by the all new doge dart. >> doge: new rules.
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[ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> jennifer: one in five kids in our country struggle with hunger. for them a free or reduced school lunch is more than just a meal. it's actually a lifeline. equally important is what is in that school lunch as part of our continuing series feed the needy, we visited one california school district with an innovative approach to the challenge of childhood hunger and malnutrition. [ children playing ] >> could you run ahead and let me know. >> he's crying.
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>> who's crying. >> where is he? >> jennifer: the job of principal is nonstop breaking up schoolyard fights. making sure that students get to class on time and learning inside the classroom. for this principal there is an equally critical job making sure that students get enough to eat. eileen smith is the principal of loma verde elementary school in california. this is one of the 25 richest communities, yet among these rolling hills and pristine houses are many families struggling to put food on the table. about 24% of the county's school children qualify for free or reduced lunches and at loma verde the figure is much higher over 45% of the kids. >> we have a number of children who are food insecure, but the
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hunger looks different. >> over 30% of low income preschool children are overweight or obese. >> with poverty there are certain places one would shop as the dollar store and those types of places. they have some inexpensive foods, but they're loaded with the sodium and the sugar. i was really humbled by taking this job and realizing that so many of the children that i see i might once have labeled having too much to eat are, in fact, the children of poverty 12,347 for eileen it's not just important that these kids have food to eat. what's critical is making sure its healthy and nutritious food. >> i like broccoli the most. >> what about you what is your favorite? >> apples and carrots. >> and pears 12,347 she found an
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ally in the food district. they would eliminate high sugar like fruit juices and chocolate milk. >> i remember parents saying what are the kids going to eat? i said they're going to drink water or milk 12,347 when miguel calculated the impact, the numbers shocked him. >> i said let's do the math. let's see how much sugar we have taken out of our program. we have estimated we've removed 500-pound of sugar per day from our program. that's serving 4500 kids. >> jennifer: in january president obama signed the hunger free kids act which gave a guideline for lunches for the first time in 15 years. kids are offered fruits and vegetables every day of the week and smaller portion sizes and reducing sodium and saturated
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fat. >> what we're doing isn't magic. it's hard work and it takes a level of intentionality. i think it means being out there, people like miguel from our food service being out on the campuses with us, listening to the children, listening to the parents it means that everybody down to the parents to the teachers, to all the staff, that they believe it that they're out there looking at what are the kids eating, talking to them about it. >> i want to you today attention. what do you usually eat for lunch? is it the menu here? do we get school lunches? do you bring lunch from home? what is that? we're going to look at the stuff you should get during the day and compare that to what you're eating and what needs to change. >> jennifer: p.e. teacher keith bergman said that his students are like food ambassadors,
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taking what they learn at school and taking taking it to their families. >> they're going to be able to help their parents in the market. anything that you can do whether it be good or bad can spread like a disease. this is a good thing. we'll spread throughout the entire family. >> when i come to work, i work at connecting the three cs. the cafeteria the classroom and the community. every day that we're here, that's what we're having to do, making sure that all those three are in sync, and if the kids are hearing these messages from all these areas, after a while they're going to get the message loud and clear. >> jennifer: in order to make sure that the message gets out to the third "c," the community miguel organizes events outside of school such as field trips to an organic farm where parents and children can learn side by side about the benefits of eating fresh vegetables. in this outing they pick kale
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and charred. >> he didn't like tomatoes before. but because they're in our garden he picks them off the vine and eats them. >> jennifer: the charred would have been put back into the soil but instead it will feed families. a weekly event called market day. >> the economy is so hard for everyone, and a lot of people are struggling with just the basics of life. >> jennifer: for anna, a mother for two the foods she picks up helps make ends meet. >> to have two children constantly depending on you. before finding work was a breeze. but a different economy different for the family. >> jennifer: for miguel another opportunity to invite parents to use that kale and chard by using
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a cooking class. >> we're not all talking about it every day. it's like seat belts. when do we not wear a seat belt. the same thing with healthy food. we've always eaten healthy food because we know what unhealthy food can do to us. >> can't get any better than that. >> jennifer: i love that story. up next it was freshman orientation day for the incoming congressional class. back to politics. who better to welcome them in washington than brett erlich. he's next in "the war room." [ forsythe ] we don't just come up here for the view up in alaska. it's the cleanest, clearest water. we find the best sweetest crab for red lobster that we can find. [ male announcer ] hurry in to red lobster's crabfest! the only time of year you can savor 5 succulent crab entrees all under 20 dollars. like a half-pound of tender snow crab paired with savory grilled shrimp, just 12.99. or our hearty crab and roasted garlic seafood bake. [ forsythe ] if i wouldn't put it on my table at home, i wouldn't bring it in.
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my name's jon forsythe and i sea food differently. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands?
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